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Compelling Evidence For Oxygen Control During Cord Blood Cell Handling

Learn why oxygen control matters for cord blood cells in our post below.

We are continuing our discussion of a recent paper in Cell (paywalled) [1] from the Broxmeyer group at Indiana University in our post on how in vivo research is affected by room air temperature.

• Murine bone marrow HSC yields were boosted by 5-fold when the cells were protected from room air oxygen during cell isolation and handling.

• HSC yields from human cord blood were increased 3-fold when the cells were protected from room air.

• This was associated with cellular ROS production linked to p53 signaling, and the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) which could be attenuated by cyclophilin D treatment.

Cyclophilin D, a powerful immunosuppressant, has off-target effects and introduces non-physiologic variability into experiments.

We take a look at a second major implication of this publication:

To quote the authors:

“The picture emerging from our studies is that harvesting donor BM in air, or even brief exposure to air (i.e., in response to EPHOSS), has a rapid, deleterious effect on numbers and repopulating potential of HSCs.”

Cells, particularly stem cells, need to be protected from room air at all times, even during cell handling outside of the hypoxic incubator.

Cord blood transplant holds tremendous clinical promise, yet the yield of cells from cord blood units for transplant remains critically limited, prompting efforts to expand cord blood HSC in the lab. [2] But what if cord blood cell yields could be increased three to five-fold just by handling the cells at 3% oxygen? That’s a lot of time, money, and wasted cells that could be saved for use in patients.

1. Mantel, C.R., et al., Enhancing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Efficacy by Mitigating Oxygen Shock. Cell, 2015. 161(7): p. 1553-65.

2. Summers, C., et al., Infusion of ex vivo expanded cord blood progenitor cells reduces the risk of bacteremia after myeloablative cord blood transplant. Blood, 2014. 124(21): p. 3860-3860.

 


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About The Author

Alicia D Henn, PhD, MBA

Alicia D Henn, PhD, MBA

Chief Scientific Officer of BioSpherix, Ltd

 

 

Alicia Henn has been the Chief Scientific Officer of BioSpherix, Ltd since 2013. Previously, she was a researcher at the Center for Biodefense Immune Modeling in Rochester, NY. Alicia obtained her PhD in molecular pharmacology and cancer therapeutics from Roswell Park Cancer Institute in Buffalo, NY and her MBA from the Simon School at University of Rochester in Rochester, NY.

ahenn@biospherix.com

 

 

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